Mayo researchers discover potential way to combat aging

Early tests on mice have scientists thinking that purging the body of what are known as "senescent cells" could help protect us from aging. But researchers will need to do much more work before they know whether drugs could be developed to help us live longer. Scientists say the discovery might be a "fundamental advance."
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Early tests on mice have scientists thinking that purging the body of what are known as "senescent cells" could help protect us from aging. But researchers will need to do much more work before they know whether drugs could be developed to help us live longer. Scientists say the discovery might be a "fundamental advance."

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