Mayo studies snake venom as heart attack treatment

The clinic has received a $2.5 million grant to study the possibility of using snake venom to reduce the damage from heart attacks.
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The clinic has received a $2.5 million grant to study the possibility of using snake venom to reduce the damage from heart attacks.

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