Mayo study links smoking ban to drop in heart attacks

A new report shows a dramatic decrease in heart attacks and cardiac deaths after a ban on smoking in workplaces in Olmsted County. "We're going to recommend that secondhand smoke be considered a sixth risk factor for coronary disease," said a doctor involved in the study.
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A new report shows a dramatic decrease in heart attacks and cardiac deaths after a ban on smoking in workplaces in Olmsted County. "We're going to recommend that secondhand smoke be considered a sixth risk factor for coronary disease," said a doctor involved in the study.

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