Medtronic to study device that could lead to artificial pancreas for diabetics

Medtronic has a green light from regulators to begin studies that could lead to automated insulin delivery. A feature in the company's insulin pumps stops sending insulin when blood sugar levels get too low.
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Medtronic has a green light from regulators to begin studies that could lead to automated insulin delivery. A feature in the company's insulin pumps stops sending insulin when blood sugar levels get too low.

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