Mendota Heights woman claims clinic planted false memories through hypnosis

The Pioneer Press has the story on Lisa Nasseff, who claims a clinic in Missouri planted false and disturbing memories in her mind while she was seeking treatment for anorexia. She has sued, and her lawyer claims she was one of several women who were fooled so the clinic could milk their insurance coverage. Among the memories she claims were planted in her mind: That she was a member of a satanic cult in St. Paul, that she had been sexually abused and that she possessed as many as 20 personalities.
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The Pioneer Press has the story on Lisa Nasseff, who claims a clinic in Missouri planted false and disturbing memories in her mind while she was seeking treatment for anorexia. She has sued, and her lawyer claims she was one of several women who were fooled so the clinic could milk their insurance coverage. Among the memories she claims were planted in her mind: That she was a member of a satanic cult in St. Paul, that she had been sexually abused and that she possessed as many as 20 personalities.

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