Minn. Catholic school teacher asked to resign over support of gay marriage

Taking a stand against the Catholic Church's stance on gay marriage, a fifth grade teacher in Moorhead is leaving her position as a fifth grade teacher at St. Joseph’s Catholic School. Trish Cameron said in a letter to parents that she was told she would not be offered a contract for the next school year because of her response to a question on a self-evaluation.
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Taking a stand against the Catholic Church's stance on gay marriage, a fifth grade teacher in Moorhead is leaving her position as a fifth grade teacher at St. Joseph’s Catholic School. Trish Cameron said in a letter to parents that she was told she would not be offered a contract for the next school year because of her response to a question on a self-evaluation.

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Catholic teacher fired over gay marriage stance shares story

After 11 years teaching fifth graders at St. Joseph's Catholic school in Moorhead, Trish Cameron revealed to school officials that she did not support the church's opposition to same-sex marriage. One week later, they asked her to resign. In an interview with MPR, she now talks about how she sees many Catholics struggling with the issue.

Catholic Church a powerful supporter of traditional marriage

Catholics makeup the single largest denomination in Minnesota. With more than a million members and hundreds of thousands in financial contributions, Minnesota Public Radio calls the Catholic Church "a powerful force in the debate over a constitutional amendment" that would essentially prohibit gay marriage.

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St. Paul-area Lutherans assembling in Burnsville, and separately, Gov. Mark Dayton and other activists holding "house parties" around the state, demonstrated their opposition to an amendment to the state Constitution that would define marriage as a union between a man and a woman.

Former Minnesota Catholic priests urge 'no' vote on marriage amendment

Flying in the face of the beliefs of the archdiocese, a small group representing more than 80 former Catholic priests from throughout Minnesota gathered Thursday to encourage a "no" on a proposed state amendment that would legally define marriage between a man and a woman. The group said the anti-gay marriage measure would violate the principles of justice and love.

Can 'true Catholics' support same-sex marriage?

Former Roman Catholic priest Jim Smith left the church about 10 years ago. He told CNN his main concern was with the church's stance against same-sex marriage. Smith says he is still a Catholic despite actively campaigning against Minnesota's constitutional amendment that would define marriage as only between one man and one woman. He has also formed a group to persuade other Catholics to vote against the measure this fall.