Minn. Court of Appeals says Orono man can keep wind turbine

The Minnesota Court of Appeals will allow an Orono man to keep his residential wind turbine that city officials say violates the zoning ordinance. The turbine is not as large as those seen in rural Minnesota and Iowa, homeowner Jay Nygard's machine is a vertical-axis turbine about 20 feet high.
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The Minnesota Court of Appeals will allow an Orono man to keep his residential wind turbine that city officials say violates the zoning ordinance, the Star Tribune says.

The turbine is not as large as those seen in rural Minnesota and Iowa, homeowner Jay Nygard's machine is a vertical-axis turbine about 20 feet high.

According to the Star Tribune, the city argues wind turbines are not permitted because they are not specifically mentioned as a "lawful accessory."

The Court of Appeals says the claim is "erroneous" because Orono allows other structures like flagpoles, basketball hoops and clotheslines also not mentioned in the ordinance.

Orono has 20 days to appeal the decision to the Minnesota Supreme Court.

This summer, Nygard told KARE 11 that he can power a third of his house with wind energy and hopes his decision will influence other cities to adopt green technologies.

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