Minn. DPS: Drunken driving deaths in 2011 down 40 percent from decade ago - Bring Me The News

Minn. DPS: Drunken driving deaths in 2011 down 40 percent from decade ago

The Minnesota Department of Public Safety says it is encouraged by the reduction of drunken driving deaths 2011 from a decade before, but notes that it is still a top safety threat. According to the Minnesota Drunk Driving Report released Friday, there were 111 drunken driving deaths in 2011, marking a 40 percent reduction in such deaths from 185 a decade ago. The report also revealed that there were 29,257 drunken driving arrests last year as well.
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The Minnesota Department of Public Safety says it is encouraged by the reduction of drunken driving deaths 2011 from a decade before, but notes that it is still a top safety threat, KARE-TV reports.

In a Minnesota Drunk Driving Report released Friday, the department said there were 111 drunken driving deaths in 2011, marking a 40 percent reduction in such deaths from 185 a decade ago. The report also revealed that there were 29,257 drunken driving arrests last year as well.

The report comes as a statewide crackdown on drunken drivers winds down to a close on Labor Day. Over the past two weekends, the Star Tribune reports, 605 drunken drivers have been arrested as part of a statewide "Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over" DWI enforcement campaign.

In a press release announcing the campaign, the state Department of Public Service said that 68 percent of deaths in drunk driving crashes in 2011 involved drivers that had alcohol concentrations twice the state's legal limit of 0.08.

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