Minneapolis crime rate remains among lowest in 30 years - Bring Me The News

Minneapolis crime rate remains among lowest in 30 years

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Despite an increase in crime this year compared to 2011, overall crime rates are still among the lowest Minneapolis has seen in the last three decades, according to a city of Minneapolis news release issued Wednesday.

As of mid-December, violent crime was up 7.6 percent compared to 2011--a year that saw violent crime drop to its lowest level since 1983.

The city attributes the increase to the first few months of the year during an upswing in crime.

The stats include September's deadliest workplace shooting in recent state history where a gunman opened fire at Accent Signage Systems that left seven dead.

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