Minneapolis to host SlutWalk this Saturday

SlutWalk rallies started after a police officer told a group of women in a public safety class to not dress like "sluts" if they wanted to avoid assault. The movement has since caught on across the world, with some marches drawing thousands of people, some dressed in provocative clothing. Supporters say it's about empowerment and taking back an insulting word, but critics say it sets back feminism.
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SlutWalk rallies started after a police officer told a group of women in a public safety class to not dress like "sluts" if they wanted to avoid assault. The movement has since caught on across the world, with some marches drawing thousands of people, some dressed in provocative clothing. Supporters say it's about empowerment and taking back an insulting word, but critics say it sets back feminism.

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