Minneapolis woman calls out Urban Outfitters for 'Navajo' collection

Sasha Houston Brown is asking for a line of products called 'Navajo' to be removed from Urban Outfitters across the country. She says the products -- including flasks, necklaces and underwear -- are not only racist, but break a federal law that prohibits companies to sell products that suggest they were made by American Indians.
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Sasha Houston Brown is asking for a line of products called 'Navajo' to be removed from Urban Outfitters across the country. She says the products -- including flasks, necklaces and underwear -- are not only racist, but break a federal law that prohibits companies to sell products that suggest they were made by American Indians.

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