Minnesota DNR, sheriff's officials to target drunk boaters statewide

The Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and sheriff's officials are stepping up efforts to keep boaters safe on lakes statewide as the 4th of July approaches. The officials are taking part in a nationwide effort called Operation Dry Water, which highlights the dangers of boating under the influence (BUI).
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The Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and sheriff's officials are stepping up efforts to keep boaters safe on lakes statewide as the 4th of July approaches. The officials are taking part in a nationwide effort called Operation Dry Water, which highlights the dangers of boating under the influence (BUI).

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