Minnesota experience inspires novel about Somali teen radicalization crisis - Bring Me The News

Minnesota experience inspires novel about Somali teen radicalization crisis

An author who lives in Minneapolis explores the radicalization of Somali teens in his new book 'Crossbones'. Nuruddin Farah was born in Somalia. His book follows a war correspondent who is on a quest to find his missing nephew believed to be fighting for a terrorist group in Mogadishu. Farah delves into the world of war profiteers who exploit the weaknesses of the innocent.
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An author who lives in Minneapolis explores the radicalization of Somali teens in his new book 'Crossbones'. Nuruddin Farah was born in Somalia. His book follows a war correspondent who is on a quest to find his missing nephew believed to be fighting for a terrorist group in Mogadishu. Farah delves into the world of war profiteers who exploit the weaknesses of the innocent.

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