Fishing licenses reel in strong sales - Bring Me The News

Fishing licenses reel in strong sales

The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources says roughly 531,000 licenses were sold through the Friday before Memorial Day, the Pioneer Press reports. Next year, the price of Minnesota hunting and fishing licenses will increase for the first time in 12 years. License sales help pay for fish stockings and surveillance of lakes.
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The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources says roughly 531,000 licenses were sold through the Friday before Memorial Day, the Pioneer Press reports. Next year, the price of Minnesota hunting and fishing licenses will increase for the first time in 12 years. License sales help pay for fish stockings and surveillance of lakes.

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