Minnesota jury deliberating raw milk case

The jury resumes deliberations Thursday in the case of a Minnesota man accused of violating the state's raw milk laws. Alvin Schlangen, an organic egg producer in central Minnesota, is charged with three misdemeanor counts including distributing unpasteurized milk. He was just the middle man in a voluntary arrangement of people sharing food, his lawyer argued Wednesday.
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The jury resumes deliberations Thursday in the case of a Minnesota man accused of violating the state's raw milk laws, the Associated Press reported.

Alvin Schlangen, an organic egg producer in central Minnesota, is charged with three misdemeanor counts that include distributing unpasteurized milk. He was just a middle man in a voluntary arrangement of people sharing food, his lawyer argued Wednesday as the case wrapped.

The case has drawn some widespread attention because it highlights a deep divide in the nation between raw milk and free choice advocates — who say it provides important health benefits – and officials who say unpasteurized milk can carry dangerous pathogens, the St. Cloud Times reports.

Schlangen is pretty active on Facebook on the issue of healthy foods and government regulation. There's more about his family farming operation, where hens get sunlight through recycled glass windows and have recycled paper bedding, on his website.

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