Minnesota lawmakers introduce bill to control cormorant population

A bipartisan bill by Reps. John Kline and Collin Peterson would give states the authority to manage the cormorant population -- which they say have displaced other species. Under current law, federal officials must first approve population control plans.
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A bipartisan bill by Reps. John Kline and Collin Peterson would give states the authority to manage the cormorant population -- which they say have displaced other species. Under current law, federal officials must first approve population control plans.

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