Minnesota, North Dakota take aim at Red River pollutants hurting Lake Winnipeg

Algae blooms that have created a dead spot in Lake Winnipeg are likely caused by phosphorus and other nutrients floating down the Red River. Minnesota and North Dakota officials say they'll work to identify the sources as a first step toward cleaning up the river.
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Algae blooms that have created a dead spot in Lake Winnipeg are likely caused by phosphorus and other nutrients floating down the Red River. Minnesota and North Dakota officials say they'll work to identify the sources as a first step toward cleaning up the river.

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