Minnesota, Ron Paul states shoved to back at RNC

States with significant Ron Paul supporters have been put in the nosebleed seats at the Tampa Bay Times Forum, where the Republican National Convention gets under way this week, Politico reports.
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The GOP has quietly arranged to seat rowdy Ron Paul supporters in the very back of the Tampa Bay Times Forum, where the Republican National Convention begins Saturday, Politico reports.

Nevada, Louisiana, Maine, Minnesota and Oklahoma, all with significant Ron Paul supporters, are located on the outer fringe of the convention floor, Politico says.

Minnesotans will be in the upper reaches behind Alaska and Connecticut, a map obtained by Politico shows. Groups with better seats include those from the Northern Mariana Islands, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico and American Samoa, Politico says.

Minnesotans are in the mix as the GOP wrestles over its brand, the Star Tribune reports. Rep. Michele Bachmann and Ron Paul's state chair threatened efforts to show that Republicans solidly support Romney, the newspaper reports.

Bachmann at a prayer rally Sunday said there's "a spiritual hurricane in our land," CNN reports.

The convention was scheduled to open Monday but has been delayed by Hurricane Isaac, the Associated Press reports.

Here's a glimpse at the venue – a time-lapse video of workers transforming the forum from a football stadium into a GOP showcase:

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