Minnesota Supreme Court: Intoxilyzer breath tests are reliable and admissible

The Supreme Court narrowly upheld a district court ruling that results from the Intoxilyzer 5000EN can be used as evidence of intoxication. The 4-3 ruling means more than 4,000 DWI cases will now proceed in Minnesota. Defense attorneys have long challenged the reliability of the testing device on the basis of errors in the instrument.
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The Supreme Court narrowly upheld a district court ruling that results from the Intoxilyzer 5000EN can be used as evidence of intoxication. The 4-3 ruling means more than 4,000 DWI cases will now proceed in Minnesota. Defense attorneys have long challenged the reliability of the testing device on the basis of errors in the instrument.

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