Minnesota to give up $1B in tobacco bonds to plug budget deficit

The state government will only get about half of that sum by asking for the money now in order to temporarily plug the state's budget deficit. Gov. Mark Dayton and lawmakers voted to borrow against the tobacco money in order to avoid tax increases and additional spending cuts.
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The state government will only get about half of that sum by asking for the money now in order to temporarily plug the state's budget deficit. Gov. Mark Dayton and lawmakers voted to borrow against the tobacco money in order to avoid tax increases and additional spending cuts.

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