Minnesota, labor officials cracking down on businesses that are cheating workers

Minnesota and eight other states are working closely with federal labor officials to root businesses that are wrongly classifying workers as independent contractors and depriving them of minimum wage and overtime.
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Minnesota and eight other states are working closely with federal labor officials to root businesses that are wrongly classifying workers as independent contractors and depriving them of minimum wage and overtime.

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