Minnesota's fall colors threatened by hot, dry weather

Thanks to the hot, dry weather this summer in Minnesota, hopes for a vibrant fall colors are fading away. In addition to lawns and crops, the weather conditions could impact trees and plants of all species, causing some of them to change color early.
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Thanks to the hot, dry weather this summer in Minnesota, hopes for a vibrant fall colors are fading away. In addition to lawns and crops, the conditions could stress trees and plants of all species, causing some of them to change color early.

Minnesota Landscape Arboretum director of operations Peter Moe tells WCCO-TV that dry conditions impacted fall colors last year, and is hoping this fall won't be a repeat.

Temperatures have been milder in August, and will remain in the mid 70s to lower 80s this week, KSTP-TV reports.

July, on the other hand, was the second hottest on record in the Twin Cities, with the average temperature just under 90 degrees.

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