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Berrian issues statement after being released by the Vikings

After being deactivated as a healthy scratch two of the last three weeks, the Vikings cut Bernard Berrian Tuesday. Afterward, Berrian issued a statement on his website saying he was blessed to have played in Minnesota for three-and-a-half years, and that he views this as an opportunity to grow as a player and bring his strengths to a new organization.

Property tax statements bring new round of political acrimony

DFL lawmakers say higher property tax bills appearing in mailboxes show that Republicans were not honest when they claimed to have balanced the state's budget without raising taxes. But the current political clamor over taxes is likely just a warm-up for next year, which happens to be an election year.

Soul Asylum to release 10th album

Minneapolis native son Dave Pirner is most famous as frontman of the seminal Minnesota rock group, Soul Asylum. The band is commemorating the release of its tenth studio album next week with a sold-out show at the 7th Street Entry. Listen in as Pirner chats in the The Current studios about the album and his life "at the bottom of the river" in New Orleans.

U of M president picks alum for second-in-command

Incoming VP and Provost Karen Hanson brings a background in the humanities at a time when the liberal arts are under attack. University President Eric Kaler says her education will help balance his own as an engineer. Hanson has said that making the case for the humanities "will have to be made again and again."

Iraq, Oman urging Iran to release Americans

Officials from Oman say a plane is in the Iranian capital standing by to transport Minnesota native Shane Bauer and his friend Josh Fattal if they're released. Mediators are reportedly negotiating with Iran. The pair has been held for more than two years on charges of spying.

ACLU releases hundreds of documents in case against now-shuttered charter school

The ACLU says the documents back up its claims that TiZA illegally funneled taxpayer money to its religious landlords and promoted Islam in the curriculum. The group also says it's looking into at least a dozen other charter schools with religious affiliations in Minnesota to see whether they might be blurring the lines between church and state.