Minnetonka principal dispels yoga pants ban, calls for modesty instead

Minnetonka High School principal Dave Adney sent an email to parents Monday to address confusion over a so-called ban on yoga pants. In the dispatch, Adney noted a new "fashion trend" where girls have "chosen to wear T-shirts with the leggings, thus exposing more leg and backside area."
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Minnetonka High School principal Dave Adney sent an email to parents Monday to address confusion over a so-called ban on yoga pants, the Minnetonka Patch reported.

In the dispatch, Adney noted a new "fashion trend" where girls have "chosen to wear T-shirts with the leggings, thus exposing more leg and backside area."

Unlike an older trend where sweatshirts and jerseys covered up the leggings, this new trend "can be highly distracting for other students," Adney noted.

The goal, Adney said in the email, is if your "daughters choose to wear leggings or other tight fitting clothing, please support our goal of keeping things covered up."

The email was countered by an outcry of tweets by Minnetonka High School students. Some, confusing the action as a ban, called the suggestion "ridiculous."

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