More medical mistakes in Minnesota, but fewer cause serious harm

A new report from the state's Department of Health shows medical mistakes in Minnesota hospitals increased from 305 in 2010 to 316 last year. Still, fewer of those mistakes caused death or serious harm to patients.
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A new report from the state's Department of Health shows medical mistakes in Minnesota hospitals increased from 305 in 2010 to 316 last year. Still, fewer of those mistakes caused death or serious harm to patients.

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