MPCA board won't require environmental review of 3M incinerator

The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency threw out a petition from residents concerned about the health impact of toxic chemicals. 3M wants to import and burn hazardous waste from other companies at its incinerator in Cottage Grove. The board will discuss the new permit to allow non-3M waste next month.
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The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency threw out a petition from residents concerned about the health impact of toxic chemicals. 3M wants to import and burn hazardous waste from other companies at its incinerator in Cottage Grove. The board will discuss the new permit to allow non-3M waste next month.

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