Mpls. firefighters say year-long review of department lacks credibility

A mistake in a consulting firm's report on the Minneapolis Fire Department has the firefighters' union doubting the reliability of the entire report. The consultant wrote that firefighters take an average of twelve sick days per year. The correct number is four. But both sides agree morale is a problem in a department that's been cut 18 percent in 11 years.
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A mistake in a consulting firm's report on the Minneapolis Fire Department has the firefighters' union doubting the reliability of the entire report. The consultant wrote that firefighters take an average of twelve sick days per year. The correct number is four. But both sides agree morale is a problem in a department that's been cut 18 percent in 11 years.

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