Muslim Brotherhood denies Bachmann allegation - Bring Me The News

Muslim Brotherhood denies Bachmann allegation

In an interview, a Muslim Brotherhood leader in Egypt’s Daqheleya province, Ibrahim Ali Iraqi, says a claim by Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn., that the group had infiltrated the U.S. government is "ridiculous." “The Muslim Brotherhood can’t even penetrate the Egyptian government,” he says.
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In an interview that appeared in GlobalPost, Muslim Brotherhood leader in Egypt’s Daqheleya province, Ibrahim Ali Iraqi, says claims by Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn., are "ridiculous."

Bachmann has alleged that the group has infiltrated the U.S. government. “The Muslim Brotherhood can’t even penetrate the Egyptian government,” Ibrahim Ali Iraqi says.

The Minnesota congresswoman is still taking fire in the media and from fellow lawmakers.

MinnPost writer Eric Black takes a look at why even Republicans are distancing themselves from Bachmann's allegations.

The Washington Post examines how Bachmann finally "jumped the shark."

And in an editorial, the Worthington Daily Globe says Bachmann needs a time-out from Washington.

But Newt Gingrich has come to Bachmann's defense.

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