Needle in haystack? Try wedding ring in corn pit - Bring Me The News

Needle in haystack? Try wedding ring in corn pit

Finding your way through the corn maze is supposed to be the hard part. But for a Fridley family the real challenge came afterwards, while playing in the three-foot-deep pit filled with corn kernels. Karilyn Miller discovered she'd lost her wedding ring. But fate - and a metal detector - was on her side as the ring amaizingly turned up.
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Finding your way through the corn maze is supposed to be the hard part. But for a Fridley family the real challenge came afterwards, while playing in the three-foot-deep pit filled with corn kernels. Karilyn Miller discovered she'd lost her wedding ring. But fate - and a metal detector - was on her side as the ring amaizingly turned up.

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