PxPixel
Neighbor charged in killing of Savanna Greywind is now pleading guilty - Bring Me The News

Neighbor charged in killing of Savanna Greywind is now pleading guilty

Greywind was 8 months pregnant when she went missing.
Author:
Publish date:
Savanna Greywind

Savanna Greywind

The Essentials

1. The woman accused in the killing of mother-to-be Savanna Greywind in hopes she could keep the baby for herself pleaded guilty Monday, Valley New Live reports.

2. Brooke Lynn Crews was charged in August with conspiracy to commit murder, conspiracy to commit kidnapping and false information. Prosecutors in Cass County, North Dakota, say Crews was involved in the death of her 22-year-old pregnant neighbor Greywind.

3. Greywind disappeared from her Fargo home on Aug. 19. Her body – wrapped in duct tape and plastic – was found in the Red River eight days later. Authorities said she died of homicidal violence. Crews and her boyfriend, who lived in the same building, were found with a newborn baby and eventually charged.

The Context

Brooke Lynn Crews and William Hoehn.

Brooke Lynn Crews and William Hoehn.

Crews, who initially pleaded not guilty, faces life in prison, Forum News Service reports. She'll be sentenced on Jan. 16, while her boyfriend – William Hoehn – is expected to go to trial in March after pleading not guilty, KTVQ.com says.

Greywind's disappearance and death shocked her community, with charges against Crews and Hoehn offering a glimpse of what might have happened

But as the Associated Press notes, authorities haven't actually revealed how they believe Greywind died.

DNA tests confirmed the infant, named Haisley Jo, is Greywind's daughter. The child was rescued and later given to Greywind's boyfriend.

After Greywind's death, the National Indigenous Women's Resource Center issued a statement saying there's "so much work to be done to end this horrific legacy and history of violence against" native women.

U.S. Sen. Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota proposed a new law, named after Greywind, to try to address the "epidemic" of missing and murdered Native American women.

Next Up

Related