New 'ACO' health care model settles into Minnesota - Bring Me The News

New 'ACO' health care model settles into Minnesota

A new push for accountable care organizations -- called ACOs -- is driving a consolidation trend among health care companies that's increasingly being felt in Minnesota, the Pioneer Press reports. One recent example: the combination of HealthPartners and Park Nicollet health systems into one of the state's largest nonprofit health companies,
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A new push for accountable care organizations -- called ACOs -- is driving a consolidation trend among health care companies that's increasingly being felt in Minnesota, the Pioneer Press reports. One recent example: the combination of HealthPartners and Park Nicollet health systems into one of the state's largest nonprofit health companies,

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