New aircraft maintenance center will bring more than 200 jobs to Duluth

Aerospace company AAR says it will revive an aircraft maintenance center that Northwest Airlines abandoned in 2005. AAR plans to start hiring this summer. The welders, mechanics, and machinists will earn $30,000 to $80,000 per year.
Author:
Publish date:

Aerospace company AAR says it will revive an aircraft maintenance center that Northwest Airlines abandoned in 2005. AAR plans to start hiring this summer. The welders, mechanics, and machinists will earn $30,000 to $80,000 per year.

Next Up

Related

Enbridge Energy bringing more than 100 new jobs to downtown Duluth

The Calgary, Alberta-based petroleum pipeline company is expanding its operations in the Twin Ports region. A company spokeswoman told the News Tribune it already has more than 550 employees and contractors. She says the new professional positions will include civil, electrical and environmental engineers and safety specialists.

Duluth region job growth jumps

Summer flooding did not put a damper on fall hiring in Duluth. The region had its best September for job growth since 1992 with a spike of 2,200 jobs compared to August, according to a new state report, the Duluth News Tribune reports. It was welcome news after a general slump in job growth that has stretched for more than a year.

'Fracking' brings new business to Duluth port

New cargo is arriving in the Twin Ports. Ships are delivering "frack" sand from Russia bound for western oilfields. Hydraulic fracturing, which is used to break up rock and release oil and gas, has stirred up some controversy because of environmental worries.

Skybridge marketing firm to bring 200 new jobs to Bemidji

The Minnesota company is expanding with a new facility in Bemidji. The Pioneer reports many of the new jobs will involve customer service work in a call center. The company's president said the firm chose Bemidji because of the number of people in the area looking for work, the communications infrastructure and the variety of training and educational opportunities.

Prices make Duluth airport more attractive

Much of the credit goes to the successful effort to draw United Airlines to the international airport. “That’s what happens when you have competition in a market,” said Brian Ryks, executive director of the Duluth Airport Authority.