New data shows little change in Minnesota student test scores - Bring Me The News

New data shows little change in Minnesota student test scores

Data released by the Minnesota Department of Education Wednesday revealed that reading and test scores among students in the state have remained relatively flat over previous years. Also, while the scores showed a wide achievement gap between white students and students of color, state officials are hoping a change in how testing data is evaluated will help them fix the persistent disparity.
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Data released by the Minnesota Department of Education Wednesday revealed that reading and test scores among students in the state have remained relatively flat over previous years. Also, while the scores showed a wide achievement gap between white students and students of color, state officials are hoping a change in how testing data is evaluated will help them fix the persistent disparity.

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