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Revised FEMA flood maps in Moorhead go into effect Tuesday

The new maps update the 100-year floodplain. Residents being added to a higher risk zone are urged to contact their insurance agents. FEMA is also revising Fargo's flood maps.
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The new maps update the 100-year floodplain. Residents being added to a higher risk zone are urged to contact their insurance agents. FEMA is also revising Fargo's flood maps.

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FEMA says no to Dayton's appeal for individual flood assistance

The Federal Emergency Management Agency denied an appeal Friday from Gov. Mark Dayton for aid for individuals and businesses affected by floods in northeastern Minnesota in June. Dayton said he was "disappointed" by FEMA's ruling and that he'll ask the state legislature for an estimated $7.4 million in assistance in an upcoming special session.

Dayton officially appeals FEMA's denial of individual flood assistance

Gov. Mark Dayton sent a letter to the Federal Emergency Management Agency Wednesday appealing the government's decision to deny financial assistance to individuals in the wake of the northeastern Minnesota floods in June. Dayton wrote in the letter to FEMA that the rain and floods in the area caused "one of the worst natural disasters in Minnesota’s history."

FEMA travels to North Shore to assess flood damage

FEMA officials were on Minnesota's North Shore Wednesday to assess the damage caused by last week's Knife River flooding, which is estimated to be between $1 million to $2 million. FEMA is expected to tour flood damage Thursday in Duluth, as well as affected areas in greater St. Louis and Carlton Counties.

Dayton looking into possible rift within FEMA over individual aid

Gov. Mark Dayton says he's heard that FEMA's regional office determined Minnesotans did qualify for individual flood aid, but was overruled by Washington, likely for budgetary reasons. Dayton says he wants to find out more. The state is appealing this week's decision denying assistance payments to individual homeowners and businesses hit by last month's floods.

Dayton will appeal FEMA decision rejecting individual flood aid

Governor Dayton ordered state officials to begin preparing an appeal after learning that FEMA has denied federal aid to individual victims of last month's flooding. The agency is providing money for 13 counties to rebuild roads and make other repairs. But money for individual homeowners and businesses was denied.

FEMA tour of Duluth wraps up flood damage assessment in 13 counties

One of the state officials who accompanied federal inspectors on their tour of flood damage says Minnesota will have no trouble passing the $7.1 million threshold to qualify for aid from FEMA. A state Senator from Duluth says the feds typically cover about three-fourths of the cost of repairs to infrastructure, with state and local governments paying the rest.