New head of the MPCA takes control

John Linc Stine told the Associated Press he believes voluntary efforts by farmers can help the state move closer to cleaning up the Mississippi and Minnesota rivers. However, he adds federal law prevents the state from forcing farmers to take any action. Stine became commissioner earlier this month after Paul Aasen left for a job with the city of Minneapolis.
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John Linc Stine told the Associated Press he believes voluntary efforts by farmers can help the state move closer to cleaning up the Mississippi and Minnesota rivers. However, he adds federal law prevents the state from forcing farmers to take any action. Stine became commissioner earlier this month after Paul Aasen left for a job with the city of Minneapolis.

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