New Minneapolis parking meters yield fewer tickets, more revenue

The new “smart” meters that accept credit cards that now regulate about 75 percent of the city’s paid parking spaces have led to fewer parking tickets and increased revenue, the Southwest Journal reports. The city made about $7.5 million from parking last year, up $1 million from 2010, when the new machines were first installed.
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The city of Minneapolis is making more money from its new credit-card "smart" parking meters, and issuing fewer tickets, the Southwest Journal reports. The city made about $7.5 million from parking last year, up $1 million from 2010, when the new machines were first installed.

The new meters were first installed in November 2010.

The city has a downtown parking meter map with pricing information, as well as a map that shows expansion plans for the new meters.

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