New photos show the aftermath of the Boundary Waters wildfire - Bring Me The News

New photos show the aftermath of the Boundary Waters wildfire

The massive wildfire in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness burned about 95,000 acres. Hundreds of firefighters from the Midwest and Rocky Mountains fought the blaze at a cost of more than $20 million. And now, with winter approaching, we're getting a look at the extent of the devastation the fire left behind.
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The massive wildfire in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness burned about 95,000 acres. Hundreds of firefighters from the Midwest and Rocky Mountains fought the blaze at a cost of more than $20 million. And now, with winter approaching, we're getting a look at the extent of the devastation the fire left behind.

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Wildfires continue to burn in Boundary Waters

Officials Saturday were still fighting two small fires by air and ground in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness, as well as a 500-acre blaze burning just across the Canadian border. Canadian crews are attacking a "very active" fire known as Fort Frances No. 59, the Duluth News Tribune reports.

Wildfire fight enlists two new air tankers

Two airplanes that each carry 11,000 gallons of water are joining the fight against the Boundary Waters wildfire. Crews hope they will help bring more of the fire under control. Firefighters are making incremental progress containing the blaze. Officials worry increasing winds this week will only make their efforts harder.

Boundary Waters fire spreads to 40 acres

A wild fire in the Boundary Waters has grown to 40 acres while firefighters on the ground work to create a control line. Although rain is not in the forecast for the very dry area, the wind is expected to die down to help crews attack the blaze.

Forestry officials underestimated beginnings of BWCA wildfire

U-S Forestry Officials vastly underestimated the beginnings of a wildfire in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area. The Star Tribune reports internal memos show an initial wait-and-see approach set the stage for the blaze to explode into the largest fire the state has seen in almost a hundred years.

Rescue in the wilderness: Man saves friend in Boundary Waters

Scott Pirsig and Bob Sturtz are 50-something pals who set off on a getaway in the woods of the Boundary Waters Canoe Area. But the trip took a dark turn when Sturtz had a stroke and Pirsig made the wrenching decision to leave his friend and go for help. The Albert Lea Tribune has the story about a dramatic rescue – and friendship.