Nobody's perfect ... well, almost nobody

Caleb Larson of Fairmont is among the one-tenth of one percent of students who earn perfect scores on their ACT exam. He's got a year of high school left but most of his classes are already college level. The two computers he built? He'll get around to mastering programming on them, but right now they're for playing games.
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Caleb Larson of Fairmont is among the one-tenth of one percent of students who earn perfect scores on their ACT exam. He's got a year of high school left but most of his classes are already college level. The two computers he built? He'll get around to mastering programming on them, but right now they're for playing games.

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