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Northern vintners praise U of M's latest cold-hardy grape

Breeders and winemakers are calling the latest grape from the University of Minnesota a "real breakthrough" and "our first real wine grape," according to the Associated Press. Marquette is the latest of four grape varieties developed by U researchers to withstand temperatures that can hit 30 below.
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Breeders and winemakers are calling the latest grape from the University of Minnesota a "real breakthrough" and "our first real wine grape," according to the Associated Press. Marquette is the latest of four grape varieties developed by U researchers to withstand temperatures that can hit 30 below.

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