'Not in our schools': Officials' warning after student brings loaded gun to Mpls school

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A high school student in Minneapolis was arrested Monday for bringing a loaded gun to school and threatening to shoot someone, prompting public school leaders to make a stand against violence in schools.

KARE 11 reports a student at Patrick Henry High School in north Minneapolis had a .38 caliber handgun in his locker, and allegedly told other students he intended to shoot someone after class.

He was arrested by the school's resource officer and the gun, along with ammunition, was removed by the authorities, the TV station notes.

On Wednesday, FOX 9 reports Minneapolis Public School officials had stern words for anyone thinking of copying the student's example, declaring the district a "violence-free zone," with Interim Superintendent Michael Goar saying: "Not in our schools."

MPS spokesperson Dick Tedmon said the district has experienced no shootings and no injuries, but it has noted "symptoms."

"There have been fights and a weapon incident in one of our schools. We've watched issues arising across the country. So MPS is putting a stop to it, right now," he added.

School officials, community leaders and students appeared at a press conference Wednesday to get this message across, WCCO reports, saying they will not tolerate any type of violence, threats, or gangs within schools.

This comes after a student at St. Paul's Harding High School was found to have a loaded gun in his locker last week, prompting his arrest by police.

Meanwhile, the Minnesota Supreme Court has agreed to take up a case examining another Minnesota school district's "zero tolerance" policy banning weapons on school grounds, after an honor student was expelled after inadvertently bringing a knife to school.

After the Minnesota Appeals Court found in the student's favor, the United South Central Public Schools challenged it in the Supreme Court, saying it undermines its attempts to "proactively" address problems with weapons in schools.

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