Officials working to find alternative for Duluth methadone clinic

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State and county officials are seeking other options for patients of the Lake Superior Treatment Center, one of five clinics in the state that provides methadone services. The clinic is pending closure on Oct. 8 after its license was revoked.

MPR News reports St. Louis County and the Department of Human Services are talking with providers in northern Minnesota who may add methadone treatment to services they already offer. The closest methadone clinic is north of Brainerd, more than 100 miles away.

A consortium of representatives from St. Louis and Carlton counties, the Duluth Police Department and the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa will choose a provider for the state to consider, the Duluth News Tribune says. DHS, which licenses methadone providers, will have the final say.

The clinic was cited in March for violating health and safety laws. Most of the violations were not corrected by last month's follow-up inspection prompting the state to revoke the clinic's license, effective Oct. 8.

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