Energy boom pushes disposable income in the Dakotas ahead of Minnesota

The benefits of the recent oil and gas boom have pushed per capita disposable personal income in North Dakota and South Dakota ahead of Minnesota, the business Journal reports. Last year, Minnesota was at $39,257, compared to North Dakota at $42,492 and South Dakota's $41,133.
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The benefits of the recent oil and gas boom have pushed per capita disposable personal income in North Dakota and South Dakota ahead of Minnesota, the Business Journal reports. Last year, Minnesota was at $39,257, compared to North Dakota at $42,492 and South Dakota's $41,133.

North Dakota's disposable income grew more than 42 percent from 2006 to 2011 -- the strongest growth rate of any state in the nation. South Dakota was the second fastest at 32.6 percent. Minnesota's disposable income over the five-year period increased 12.7 percent.

Click here, for data from all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

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