Oops: some show up at primary to vote on marriage amendment

Minnesotans who came to the polls on primary day to vote for or against the proposed Constitutional amendments were disappointed. The amendments were not on the ballot. The marriage and voter ID questions don't come up for a vote until the general election in November. An election official says the mistake is not surprising, with all the attention paid to the amendments.
Author:
Publish date:

Minnesotans who came to the polls on primary day to vote for or against the proposed Constitutional amendments were disappointed. The amendments were not on the ballot. The marriage and voter ID questions don't come up for a vote until the general election in November. An election official says the mistake is not surprising, with all the attention paid to the amendments.

Next Up

Related

Clergy busy during final weekend of campaign for, against marriage amendment

Religious leaders are at the forefront of the final weekend of campaigning for and against the marriage amendment on Tuesday's ballot. More than 500 Christian leaders with the group Minnesota Pastors For Marriage released a statement in support of the amendment that would Constitutionally define marriage as an opposite sex union. Opponents planned a worship service followed by the blessing of a "Minnesota Votes No Tour" that will travel the state until Election Day.

New poll: Marriage amendment vote could be toss-up

Just two days after another poll found majority support for the Minnesota ballot measure that would ban gay marriage, another new poll shows just 48 percent in favor of it, 47 percent opposed – well within the margin of error and suggesting the vote could go either way.

Debate intensifies as marriage vote nears

The war over marriage in Minnesota has reached all corners of the state. Some dispatches from the front: Pro-amendment signs were vandalized at a Bemidji church. A local Ely newspaper owner says gay couples can take their wedding announcements elsewhere. And high-profile GOP operative Michael Brodkorb – among the very strategists who helped get the amendment on the ballot – says he will vote no.

GOP lawmakers push amendments to state constitution in 2012

The Republican controlled House and Senate are looking to make nearly a dozen changes this year, but without Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton's approval. Lawmakers can make this happen by passing legislation that puts an amendment on the November ballot. KARE 11 reports the same sex marriage legislation is the only amendment on this year's ballot right now, but others being considered include Voter ID laws, Right to Work issues, abortion restrictions and tax limitations.

Those who choose not to vote on marriage amendment still affect outcome

The special interests behind both sides of the gay marriage debate are raising millions of dollars as they ramp up for what's shaping up to be a close fight. But while a recent survey shows a nearly 50-50 split in support for the amendment, a peculiarity in Minnesota's voting laws means it could take much more than that to pass it.

Historic upset: Marriage amendment fails

With 98 percent of the vote counted, it appears the marriage amendment has failed. The result was striking development after similar measures have been passed in 30 states – and never before defeated. Associated Press exit polls showed a majority of women voted against the Minnesota measure and a majority of men voted for it. Young people voted against it in big numbers.

Marriage amendment vote close; voter ID likely to pass

A new KSTP/SurveyUSA poll shows the battle between supporters and opponents of a ballot measure that would ban gay marriage could result in the closest statewide race on Election Day. The survey shows 48 percent support the amendment that would define marriage as between a man and woman, and 47 percent oppose it.

Ritchie also reworks ballot title of voter photo ID amendment

Minnesota Secretary of State Mark Ritchie is changing the title of the constitutional amendment to “Changes to in-person & absentee voting & voter registration; provisional ballots." Sponsors of the measure, seeking to require voters to show a photo ID before casting a ballot, want the question titled "Photo Identification Required for Voting." Ritchie is being sued for changing the title on the marriage amendment question.