Oops: some show up at primary to vote on marriage amendment - Bring Me The News

Oops: some show up at primary to vote on marriage amendment

Minnesotans who came to the polls on primary day to vote for or against the proposed Constitutional amendments were disappointed. The amendments were not on the ballot. The marriage and voter ID questions don't come up for a vote until the general election in November. An election official says the mistake is not surprising, with all the attention paid to the amendments.
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Minnesotans who came to the polls on primary day to vote for or against the proposed Constitutional amendments were disappointed. The amendments were not on the ballot. The marriage and voter ID questions don't come up for a vote until the general election in November. An election official says the mistake is not surprising, with all the attention paid to the amendments.

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