Panel backs Minnesota cash-flow borrowing

The Legislative Advisory Commission is hoping that short-term borrowing isn't necessary but says they want to be prepared if it is. Growth for the state's economy has dropped by more than half so far this year.
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The Legislative Advisory Commission is hoping that short-term borrowing isn't necessary but says they want to be prepared if it is. Growth for the state's economy has dropped by more than half so far this year.

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