Panel tells FDA risks of Medtronic heart device outweigh benefits - Bring Me The News

Panel tells FDA risks of Medtronic heart device outweigh benefits

The news is a blow for Medtronic and investors, who expected big things from an experimental device that uses extreme heat to regulate heartbeat. Medtronic bought the company that developed the device for $225 million in 2009. The panel's recommendation isn't the final say, but the FDA will take it under consideration.
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The news is a blow for Medtronic and investors, who expected big things from an experimental device that uses extreme heat to regulate heartbeat. Medtronic bought the company that developed the device for $225 million in 2009. The panel's recommendation isn't the final say, but the FDA will take it under consideration.

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