Parents of student found dead after becoming informant want feds to investigate - Bring Me The News

Parents of student found dead after becoming informant want feds to investigate

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 (Photo: Justice for Andrew Sadek, Facebook)

(Photo: Justice for Andrew Sadek, Facebook)

The parents of a college student found dead after becoming a drug informant want the FBI to investigate the case.

Valley News Live reports Tammy and John Sadek, whose son Andrew was found in the Red River two years ago with a gunshot wound to the head, say they're frustrated with the lack of progress in the case.

It's currently being investigated by a few state agencies, including the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension since Sadek's body was found on that side of the river, The Forum reports.

But the Sadek parents are now requesting the FBI or federal Department of Justice take over the investigation, Valley News Live says.

The Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, in a statement sent to BringMeTheNews, said it's working with the two other North Dakota agencies to conduct the investigation.

"We know his family and the community want answers about what happened, and so do we," it said, adding they offered the family investigators' contact information so they could reach out.

The bureau also said it's "legally obligated to protect the integrity of the investigation," and that Minnesota law prevents them from sharing data with the public until the investigation is closed.

"Until evidence emerges that proves or eliminates one theory over all others, and as long as the autopsy findings are considered undetermined, investigators will continue to consider every possibility," the statement says.

Andrew Sadek's case

Sadek, 20 years old and a student at North Dakota State College of Science at the time, was found dead in the Red River in May of 2014 with a gunshot wound to the head.

Since then, it’s been revealed that Sadek was busted for selling marijuana, about $80 worth, months before. With the threat of charges hanging over his head, he agreed to become a confidential informant for regional authorities.

The details of Sadek’s role with law enforcement are written in an official review of how the Southeast Multi-County Agency (SEMCA) Drug Task Force handled the college student – but it found no concerns with how officers handled the case.

CBS’s “60 Minutes” examined Sadek's case (and other similar ones) last fall.

Last December, a U.S. senator from Tennessee said he wanted the practice of using low-level offenders as drug informants investigated.

A recent forum between North Dakota gubernatorial candidates included a conversation about reforming laws around the use of confidential informants. You can watch it at around the 52-minute mark of part three of the forum here.

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