Penguins from space: U of M satellite images help scientists get count of emperor penguins

New satellite images published by the University of Minnesota's Polar Geospacial Center reveal there are more than twice as many emperor penguins than originally thought. That's the good news. The bad news is the photos are a baseline to follow the possible decline of the famous flightless birds as climate change continues
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If you didn't know what you were looking at the photos of the beloved Antarctic emperor penguins look a lot like smudges on an abstract art canvas. But the University of Minnesota reveals those smudges help researchers discover there are more than twice as many of the flightless birds than originally thought.

Cape Roget

Peterson Bank

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