Police chief Gordon Ramsay is saying goodbye to Duluth

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Duluth is losing its police chief Gordon Ramsay, who accepted an offer to take on the same role in Wichita, Kansas.

Ramsay announced the end of his nearly 10-year tenure "with a heavy heart" on his Facebook page, saying it was "the most difficult decision of my life."

"Duluth is my hometown and I am heavily invested in this community," he wrote, before thanking Mayors Don Ness and Herb Bergson, adding: "The people of Duluth have been so good to me and my family that I have a difficult time talking about it.

"Thank you for all of your support over the years. I am going to miss you terribly Duluth."

He becomes the second leader stepping down or leaving the city in a short period of time, with Ness set to end his eight-year stint as the northern Minnesota city's popular mayor next month.

Ramsay also had some words to say for his new home of Wichita, appearing in a video on the city's Facebook page saying he is "excited at the limitless opportunities."

"This is a very exciting time for me and I cannot wait to start in my new position," he added.

He beat out Jeffery Spivey, the assistant police chief in Irving, Texas, for the position, with Wichita City Manager Robert Layton telling media that Ramsay's "proven track record as a police chief" was the crucial difference.

"In 10 years he achieved many of the objectives we have for our department," he said.

The Duluth News Tribune reports Ramsay, 43, will begin work in Wichita on Jan. 28 and earn $170,000 a year.

He takes on a bigger challenge too, as Wichita's 382,000 residents, $82 million police budget and 830 employees dwarfs Duluth's 86,000 people, $20 million budget and 180 employees, the newspaper notes.

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