After chaos in downtown Minneapolis, police review social media, surveillance video

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Minneapolis police are trying to determine how, and why, hundreds of young people flooded the streets of the city's downtown Tuesday night, apparently intent on fighting and causing a mess.

At a press conference downtown Wednesday, Minneapolis Police Chief Janeé Harteau said the types of disturbances seen after the St. Patrick's Day celebration "will not be tolerated."

Police pegged the number of teens and young adults participating in the commotion at about 300, with police telling reporters the teens were running through the area, blocking traffic, pushing and shoving each other and getting into fights.

The incident began around 8 p.m. after the St. Patrick’s Day parade along Nicollet Mall ended. Minneapolis police officials say the teenagers came downtown on buses and trains – which offered free rides for the holiday.

Minneapolis police said six arrests were made, and two people who were brawling were treated for minor injuries. No bystanders were hurt.

Now, the question is – why?

The Pioneer Press reports police say there was no looting, or damage done to property.

According to WCCO, Harteau described the event as "spontaneous" and "rapid," saying investigators are working to pin down exactly how the participants communicated with one another so quickly.

KSTP reports one witness believes things began simmering on social media, and the people involved then met downtown to settle the issue in real life.

FOX 9 says police have a bevy of surveillance video to comb through as well.

Mayor Betsy Hodges, in a statement on her Facebook page, thanked law enforcement for how they handled the disturbance.

"Multiple fights broke out internally among the group of kids along the downtown corridor – luckily there were no serious injuries," Hodges wrote. "The fights and large group of kids shut down traffic in some spots, but there was no threat to the general public at any time."

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