Police say couple strips foreclosed home of $23,000 worth of appliances and other items

Police say couple hired a man to take toilets, light fixtures, appliances and even the kitchen sink from their former home that had been foreclosed on. A number of the missing goods were found in the couple's current home in Edina.
Author:
Publish date:

Police say couple hired a man to take toilets, light fixtures, appliances and even the kitchen sink from their former home that had been foreclosed on. A number of the missing goods were found in the couple's current home in Edina.

Next Up

Related

OccupyMN protesters occupy foreclosed home

The TC Daily Planet is reporting some demonstrators connected to the OccupyMN movement have occupied a foreclosed home in north Minneapolis to keep the residents from being evicted. The protesters say they intend to stay in the home and in tents on the property until U.S. Bank agrees to renegotiate the mortgage. They say they will resist if authorities try to forcefully evict the residents.

Despite arrests, Occupy Minn. protestors say they'll reoccupy foreclosed home

Apparently 14 arrests at a Minneapolis home Wednesday won't be enough to keep some Occupy protestors away from the foreclosed dwelling. The group Occupy Homes Minnesota on Friday sent out an email vowing to reoccupy the Cruz home Saturday afternoon. An estimated 100 protestors gathered at the residence Wednesday after the family had been evicted.

Family of White Bear Lake couple in Italy

Relatives of Jerry and Barbara Heil met with rescue crews Saturday. The couple is still missing after last week's cruise ship accident off the coast of Italy. The Associated Press reports family members were taken near the ship and placed flowers in honor of their loved ones.

Some homes in Oakdale are sinking, and that's an expensive problem

Several homes in a townhouse association in Oakdale are sinking, which is causing cabinets and baseboards to separate from the walls and floors. One homeowner tells KSTP that engineers told him fixing the problem would cost upwards of $70,000, and an attorney with the housing association says insurance will not cover it.